the blog 2017-04-03T15:03:07-04:00

Here at Dorchester County Tourism, we know about so many special gems, hidden places, and fun events that we decided to share some of these with you on this blog. Enjoy!

Dorchester Trails & Waters

Around Dorchester, it’s hard to tell where land ends and water begins. In this low-lying county, the brackish waters of the Chesapeake Bay meet freshwater flowing from no fewer than seven river systems and countless creeks. The water ranges from salty to fresh, resulting in a great variety of habitat for waterfowl, furbearers, crabs, and fish. The changing seasons add even more diversity and interest for cyclists, hikers, paddlers, birders, anglers, hunters, and those who tour by car....

May 20th, 2020|Comments Off on Dorchester Trails & Waters

Friendship Forged on the Nanticoke

Speaking with Midge Ingersoll and Shirley Jackson is like spending a sunny spring morning enjoying a fresh-from-the-oven croissant while catching up with old friends … which is where we found ourselves recently when we sat down with these women of influence in Dorchester’s preservation community. Midge and Shirley share a warm friendship formed 13 years ago on the foundation of an historic home near Vienna.

April 16th, 2020|Comments Off on Friendship Forged on the Nanticoke

Harriet Tubman Visitor Center’s Leaders

March 10 marks Harriet Tubman Day in Maryland. To commemorate her legacy – and the third anniversary of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad (UGRR) Visitor Center – we spoke with three women whose paths converged at the national monument and state park that bear her name. Read our interview and decide whether it was fate or destiny that brought this talented team of environmentalists, storytellers, and park leaders to Church Creek, Maryland. The "Tubman Team" interviews include Deanna Mitchell, superintendent, Harriet Tubman UGRR National Historical Park; and Dana Paterra, manager, and Angela Crenshaw, assistant manager, Harriet Tubman UGRR State Park.)

March 3rd, 2020|Comments Off on Harriet Tubman Visitor Center’s Leaders

MD County Has Power to Change You

This slice of the Eastern Shore is an ideal destination for vacationers looking to try out “transformative travel.” For modern tourists, every vacation is an opportunity to grow. They’re seeking out travel experiences that transform their perspective or deepen their understanding of the world. Experts call this movement “transformative travel,” and it’s been hailed as a global trend by major tourism boards worldwide.

February 23rd, 2020|Comments Off on MD County Has Power to Change You

How Dorchester Delivers a Dose of Health

a visit to Dorchester County offers more than just a fun outdoorsy weekend — research shows that spending time outside is good for your health. That’s likely why three-quarters of American adults reported in one survey that they’d like to spend more time outside and forge a closer connection to nature...

April 3rd, 2019|Comments Off on How Dorchester Delivers a Dose of Health

The View North at Tubman Visitor Center

Chris Elcock first visited the future site of the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitors Center in July of 2008. He’d come across the bridge from Baltimore that day in order to help decide whether his firm, GWWO Architects, would throw its hat in the ring when it came time to design the facility...

July 21st, 2016|0 Comments

Windmills on our minds

As we get ready to celebrate Earth Day at Spocott Windmill on April 23, we thought we'd take a moment to look back at the importance of windmills in Dorchester County... The first windmills were probably developed in China about 2,000 years ago, but the first drawing of a windmill was in Persia some 500 years later. Improved by millwrights in the Middle East and Europe, they eventually pivoted to catch the wind from all directions and had adjustable sails to control speed. Wind-powered machines met the needs of growing populations – grinding grain and spices, pumping water to drink or drain land – until wind gave way to steam and the Industrial Revolution in the 1800s.

April 7th, 2016|0 Comments

Duck, duck, goose!

Waterfowl love Dorchester County! This stands to reason since the Chesapeake is located in the Atlantic Flyway, a kind of a north-south super highway for migrating birds. Among the thousands of avian species who spend time here, the most abundant are Canada geese, swans, and more than 20 different kinds of ducks. From the air, they are enticed by the expansive marshes and sparse population to take the exit ramp to Dorchester and a break from their flights. Some stay for a few days - eat, rest, and continue on their journeys. Others remain for months and enjoy the hospitality of Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge before returning to their northern nesting places.

March 25th, 2016|0 Comments

The new face of the $20: where her story began

If you’re heading to Dorchester County his weekend, the area around Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge will be alive with activities. On Thursday, March 10, there will be a symposium to commemorate the life and legacy of Harriet Tubman at the Refuge Visitor Center. On Saturday, activities are planned along the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway from Blackwater to Delaware. At the same time, the Refuge is hosting it 16th Annual Eagle Festival.

March 10th, 2016|0 Comments

Muskrat champ, eel pot weaver, grandmother

For Rhonda Aaron, this time of year is all about muskrat. She's practicing her skills at skinning the furry rodents that live in our local marshes. She's experimenting with muskrat recipes. And she's gathering up her muskrat memorabilia—a stuffed muskrat here, an old photo there. It's all for the 71st annual National Outdoor Show, a one-of-a-kind event happening Feb. 26-27 that celebrates rural Dorchester County culture with a mix of muskrat skinning, trap setting, and goose calling contests, plus gun dogs, oyster races -- and tiaras.

February 23rd, 2016|3 Comments

Seven Sheep, a Cook and Karma

In February, people around Dorchester County proudly recall the role a local militia played in defending some local farmers on Taylors Island. The Battle of the Ice Mound was fought in the closing days of the War of 1812, after the British Parliament had signed the Treaty of Ghent ending hostilities but nine days before the US Senate approved the accord. It was the last fight of the War of 1812 on the Chesapeake, which the British had effectively blockaded for three years.

February 10th, 2016|0 Comments